Blog Posts - Biodiversity



Influential conservation ecology papers of 2016

As I have done for the last three years (2015, 2014, 2013), here’s another retrospective list of the top 20 influential conservation papers of 2016 as assessed by experts in F1000 Prime. Scaling laws predict global microbial diversity — ...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 15, 2016

Scientists examine 'perfect storms' fueling vast tropical biodiversity

Biodiversity on earth is greatest in the tropics with the number and variety of species gradually diminishing toward the poles. Understanding exactly what shapes this pattern, known as the latitudinal diversity gradient, is not just key to knowing th...
by The Archaeology News Network on Dec 14, 2016

Genetic Management of Fragmented Animal and Plant Populations

That is the title of a new textbook that will be available mid-2017. After almost 6 years work, authors Dick Frankham, Jonathan Ballou, Katherine Ralls, Mark Eldridge, Michele Dudash, Charles Fenster, Bob Lacy & Paul Sunnucks have produced an...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 10, 2016

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XL

That’s ’40’, of course. Six more biodiversity cartoons, and the last for 2016. See full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here. — Filed under: cartoon, conservation, environmental policy, sc...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 6, 2016

The most interesting 10 species of animals in 2016

An international committee of biologists chose the most interesting species described in 2016The most interesting10 species described in 2016 were designated as "International Institute for Species Exploration" and a committee of biologists and natur...
by Potent Scientia Est on Sep 21, 2016

Inexorable rise of human population pressures in Africa

I’ve been a bit mad preparing for an upcoming conference, so I haven’t had a lot of time lately to blog about interesting developments in the conservation world. However, it struck me today that my preparations provide ideal material for...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 31, 2016

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXXVIII

Another six biodiversity cartoons for your midday chuckle & groan. There’s even one in there that takes the mickey out of some of my own research (see if you can figure out which one). See full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodive...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 25, 2016

Rich and stable communities most vulnerable to change

I’ve just read an interesting new study that was sent to me by the lead author, Giovanni Strona. Published the other day in Nature Communications, Strona & Lafferty’s article entitled Environmental change makes robust ecological ne...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 16, 2016

Keeping India’s forests

I’ve just returned from a short trip to the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) in Bangalore, Karnataka, one of India’s elite biological research institutes. I was invited to give a series of seminars (you can see the titles he...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 8, 2016

New genome reveals how Arctic microbes survive in cold extreme habitats

Scientists at the University of Bristol have revealed how a tiny Arctic microbe, crucial to shaping the surface of glaciers, survives in such extreme conditions. The cyanobacterium Phormidesmis priestleyi BC1401 was isolated from cryoconite  on...
by The Archaeology News Network on Aug 5, 2016

More things stay the same, more we retrogress

Within six months of Abbott and the Coalition seizing power in the 2013 Australian election, decades—if not centuries—of environmental damage and retrograde policies unfolded. But this was no run-of-the-mill incompetence and neglect by government...
by Conservation Bytes on Jul 20, 2016

There are so many Amazonian tree species, we won't discover the last one for 300 years

There are more different kinds of trees in the Amazon rainforest than anywhere else on earth, but the exact number has long been a mystery. In 2013, scientists estimated that the number of species was around 16,000—no one had ever counted them all...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 15, 2016

Seeing the wood for the trees

From the towering kapoks of South America to the sprawling banyans of South Asia, from misty cloud forests to ice-covered pines, forests are some of the most diverse and important ecosystems on Earth. However, as conservationists and foresters try t...
by Conservation Bytes on Jul 11, 2016

Humans artificially drive evolution of new species

Species across the world are rapidly going extinct due to human activities, but humans are also causing rapid evolution and the emergence of new species. A new study published today summarises the causes of humanmade speciation, and discusses why new...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 30, 2016

Penguin population could drop 60 percent by end of the century

Climate has influenced the distribution patterns of Adélie penguins across Antarctica for millions of years. University of Delaware researchers project that approximately 30 percent of current Adélie colonies may be in decline by 2060 and approxim...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 30, 2016

Buying time

Originally published in the Otago Daily Times by Tom McKinlay — If we don’t act soon, the world we leave our children will be in a sorry state indeed, leading Australian scientist Prof Corey Bradshaw tells Tom McKinlay. Prof Corey Bradsha...
by Conservation Bytes on Jun 26, 2016

Hairs, feathers and scales have a lot in common

The potential evolutionary link between hairs in mammals, feathers in birds and scales in reptiles has been debated for decades. Today, researchers of the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Switzerland, demons...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 26, 2016

Extinction synergy: deadly combination of human hunting & climate change wrote off Patagonian giants

Here’s a paper we’ve just had published in Science Advances (Synergistic roles of climate warming and human occupation in Patagonian megafaunal extinctions during the Last Deglaciation). It’s an excellent demonstration of our concep...
by Conservation Bytes on Jun 19, 2016

What immigration means for Australia’s climate-change policies

After dipping my foot into the murky waters of human population demography a few years ago, I’m a little surprised that I find myself here again. But this time I’m not examining what the future of the global human population might be and...
by Conservation Bytes on Jun 11, 2016

Hydrothermal vents, methane seeps play enormous role in marine life, global climate

The hydrothermal vents and methane seeps on the ocean floor that were once thought to be geologic and biological oddities are now emerging as a major force in ocean ecosystems, marine life and global climate. A lush community of vibrant red tube wor...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jun 2, 2016


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