Blog Posts - Biodiversity



How things have (not) changed

The other night I had the pleasure of dining with the former Australian Democrats leader and senator, Dr John Coulter, at the home of Paul Willis‘ (Director of the Royal Institution of Australia). It was an enlightening evening. While we discu...
by Conservation Bytes on Apr 12, 2015

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXIX

Second batch of six biodiversity cartoons for 2015 (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). — Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, ca...
by Conservation Bytes on Apr 9, 2015

Australians: out-of-touch, urban squanderers

There’s a romantic myth surrounding Australia that is pervasive both overseas and within the national psyche: this sun-scorched continent home to the stoic bushmen1 that eek out a frugal, yet satisfying existence in this harsh rural land. Unf...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 22, 2015

Australia’s perfect storm of negligence

If, for the purposes of some sick and twisted thought experiment, you were to design policies that would ensure the long-term failure of a wealthy, developed nation, you wouldn’t have to look farther than Australia’s current recipe for f...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 17, 2015

Social and economic value of protected areas

I’ve just come across an exceptionally important paper published recently in PLoS Biology by a team of venerable conservation biologists led by the eminent Andy Balmford of the University of Cambridge. My first response was ‘Holy shit&#...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 1, 2015

Earth’s second lung has emphysema

Many consider forests as the ‘lungs’ of the planet – the idea that trees and other plants take up carbon and produce oxygen (the carbon and oxygen cycles). If we are to be fair though, the oceans store about 93% of the Earth̵...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 18, 2015

The Abbott-oir survives another day to wreak more environmental havoc

Tone Abbott-oir, easily the most environmentally destructive Prime Minister this country has seen in the modern era, has survived the party room spill for a leadership change. Although 39% of his own Fiberal Party MPs voted to dump him, he remains s...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 8, 2015

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXVIII

First batch of six biodiversity cartoons for 2015 (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, bees, biodiversity...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 3, 2015

Ecological Land Units (ELUs) Map of the World. ESRI and USGS

Hi Everyone! Today I recommend you the highest spatial resolution ecological land units (ELUs) map of the world developed by ESRI and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), commissioned by the intergovernmental Group on Earth Obse...
by A Botanical Refuge on Jan 14, 2015

Ecological Land Units (ELUs) Map of the World. ESRI and USGS

Hi Everyone! Today I recommend you the highest spatial resolution ecological land units (ELUs) map of the world developed by ESRI and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), commissioned by the intergovernmental Group on Earth Obse...
by A Botanical Refuge on Jan 14, 2015

It’s all about the variation, stupid

It is one of my long-suffering ecological quests to demonstrate to the buffoons in government and industry that you can’t simply offset deforestation by planting another forest elsewhere. While it sounds attractive, like carbon offsetting or...
by Conservation Bytes on Jan 11, 2015

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXVII

Here are the last 6 biodiversity cartoons for 2014 because, well, why not? (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthrop...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 30, 2014

Influential conservation papers of 2014

Another year, another arbitrary retrospective list – but I’m still going to do it. Based on the popularity of last year’s retrospective list of influential conservation papers as assessed through F1000 Prime, here are 20 conservatio...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 21, 2014

JP Park @ Bangalore

Kids are nagging you during weekend? Feeling Lazy, don't wan't to travel and neither sit at home, just want to spend 2-3 hours? Then  Jayaprakash Narayan Biodiversity Park (JP Park) may be good option. The cool breeze, silent lake, chirping...
by Travel Enthusiasts on Dec 19, 2014

Scottish Wildcats

I have mentioned Scottish wildcats before.  I am delighted that new money has been released to protect one of our most charismatic fauna. ...
by James Powney's Blog on Dec 15, 2014

An Open Letter to Environmentalists on Nuclear Energy

Professor Barry W. Brook, Chair of Environmental Sustainability, University of Tasmania, Australia. barry.brook@utas.edu.au Professor Corey J.A. Bradshaw, Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change, The Environment Institute, The University of Adelai...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 14, 2014

Psychological toll of being a sustainability scientist

Like many academics, I’m more or less convinced that I am somewhere on the mild end of the autism spectrum. No, I haven’t been diagnosed and I doubt very much that my slight ‘autistic’ tendencies have altered my social capaci...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 7, 2014

Using ecological theory to make more money

Let’s face it: Australia doesn’t have the best international reputation for good ecological management. We’ve been particularly loathsome in our protection of forests, we have an appalling record of mammal extinctions, we’re...
by Conservation Bytes on Nov 30, 2014

Get serious about divestment

We are a sensitive and conflict-avoiding lot, aren’t we? Most scientists I know absolutely dread reprisals of any form, whether they are from a colleague commenting on their work, a sensationalism-seeking journalist posing nasty questions, or...
by Conservation Bytes on Nov 20, 2014

Innate cruelty and exploitation: does biodiversity stand a chance?

Earlier this year I took my daughter to the South Australian Museum, as I often do on weekends. We usually have lunch at the Art Gallery, and then wander the various levels of the Museum at a pace suitable for a 7-year old. The South Australia biodi...
by Conservation Bytes on Nov 10, 2014


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