Blog Posts - British History



T01: Siglo XVIII: Antiguo Régimen, Ilustración, Revolución

Palabras del GlosarioMíralo aquíPreguntas tipo test para el examen:...
by SS-CCSS on Dec 8, 2016

Celebrating Canada’s diversity

I suppose one of the advantages of getting to a certain age is the view it offers of how dramatically things have changed, in so many ways. Whatever may be happening elsewhere in the world that is troubling and worrisome, my country, Canada, has chan...
by Finding Hope Ness on May 10, 2016

Celebrating Canada’s diversity

I suppose one of the advantages of getting to a certain age is the view it offers of how dramatically things have changed, in so many ways. Whatever may be happening elsewhere in the world that is troubling and worrisome, my country, Canada, has chan...
by Finding Hope Ness on May 10, 2016

English Reformation in the XVIth century

English Reformation: a brief historylist-of-kings-queens-of-britainQueen Elizabeth I...
by SS-CCSS on Nov 15, 2015

Archaeologists Claim Possible Remains of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson

Scottish archaeologists have proposed a theory that outlines the possibility that an excavated skeleton is that of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson. The skeleton was unearthed in Auldhame in East Lothian during a 2005 dig conducted by the AOC Archaeolo...
by Today In British History on Jun 2, 2014

Archaeologists Claim Possible Remains of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson

Scottish archaeologists have proposed a theory that outlines the possibility that an excavated skeleton is that of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson. The skeleton was unearthed in Auldhame in East Lothian during a 2005 dig conducted by the AOC Archaeolo...
by Today In British History on Jun 2, 2014

Archaeologists Claim Possible Remains of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson

Scottish archaeologists have proposed a theory that outlines the possibility that an excavated skeleton is that of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson. The skeleton was unearthed in Auldhame in East Lothian during a 2005 dig conducted by the AOC Archaeolo...
by Today In British History on Jun 2, 2014

Archaeologists Claim Possible Remains of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson

Scottish archaeologists have proposed a theory that outlines the possibility that an excavated skeleton is that of Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson. The skeleton was unearthed in Auldhame in East Lothian during a 2005 dig conducted by the AOC Archaeolo...
by Today In British History on Jun 2, 2014

On This Day in 1940 Winston Churchill is Appointed Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

From British HistoryWinston Churchill watches a Boeing Fortress Mk I giving a flying display RAF bomber station, 6 June 1941On 10 May 1940, hours before the German invasion of France by a lightning advance through the Low Countries, it became clear...
by SUNLIT UPLANDS on May 10, 2014

Black Death Skeletons in London

Recent forensic tests conducted on the skeletons unearthed during the London Crossrail project have revealed that the skeletons were victims of the 14th century Black Death. In all, 25 skeletons were unearthed from a 5.5m shaft beneath Charterhouse S...
by Today In British History on Mar 30, 2014

Black Death Skeletons in London

Recent forensic tests conducted on the skeletons unearthed during the London Crossrail project have revealed that the skeletons were victims of the 14th century Black Death. In all, 25 skeletons were unearthed from a 5.5m shaft beneath Charterhouse S...
by Today In British History on Mar 30, 2014

Black Death Skeletons in London

Recent forensic tests conducted on the skeletons unearthed during the London Crossrail project have revealed that the skeletons were victims of the 14th century Black Death. In all, 25 skeletons were unearthed from a 5.5m shaft beneath Charterhouse S...
by Today In British History on Mar 30, 2014

Black Death Skeletons in London

Recent forensic tests conducted on the skeletons unearthed during the London Crossrail project have revealed that the skeletons were victims of the 14th century Black Death. In all, 25 skeletons were unearthed from a 5.5m shaft beneath Charterhouse S...
by Today In British History on Mar 30, 2014

Black Death Skeletons in London

Recent forensic tests conducted on the skeletons unearthed during the London Crossrail project have revealed that the skeletons were victims of the 14th century Black Death. In all, 25 skeletons were...
by Today In British History on Mar 30, 2014

Was Jerome Caminada the ‘Real Sherlock Holmes’?

Ever since Sherlock Holmes first became popular as the super-sleuth creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, theories have been proposed about who may have been the real-life inspiration for the now iconic detective. In her new biography The Real Sherlock...
by Today In British History on Mar 22, 2014

Was Jerome Caminada the ‘Real Sherlock Holmes’?

Ever since Sherlock Holmes first became popular as the super-sleuth creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, theories have been proposed about who may have been the real-life inspiration for the now iconic detective. In her new biography The Real Sherlock...
by Today In British History on Mar 22, 2014

Was Jerome Caminada the ‘Real Sherlock Holmes’?

Ever since Sherlock Holmes first became popular as the super-sleuth creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, theories have been proposed about who may have been the real-life inspiration for the now iconic detective. In her new biography The Real Sherlock...
by Today In British History on Mar 22, 2014

Was Jerome Caminada the ‘Real Sherlock Holmes’?

Ever since Sherlock Holmes first became popular as the super-sleuth creation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, theories have been proposed about who may have been the real-life inspiration for the now...
by Today In British History on Mar 22, 2014

An Anglo-Saxon Royal Village at Rendlesham?

Though Rendlesham may be well known as “Britain’s Roswell” for the 1980 Rendlesham Forest UFO incident, it is now making news for the discovery of something that has been there for...
by Today In British History on Mar 13, 2014

A Scottish tale of murder, incest and cannibalism.

The LegendThe tale of Sawney Bean, arguably Scotland's most shocking and gruesome legend, was said to have taken place on the usually idyllic coast of the south-west.The most commonly told account of Sawney Bean begins in East Lothian where Alexander...


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