Blog Posts - Charlotte Bronte



Imagining Monsters

All fiction writing, it is often said, is borrowing. I’m not exactly sure that’s literally true, but the basic idea is that writers often trade with one another. They also borrow against their own experience and observations that others have R...

Happy Birthday, Charlotte! And, Thanks For Writing Jane Eyre

When I revisited this post today, with a picture taken in the bleakest days of February when I reread Jane Eyre, I thought the photo a little dark. Yet, it is perfect for much of the novel. So many parts of it are almost hopeless, and yet we read on...
by Dolce Bellezza on Apr 21, 2016

Happy Birthday, Charlotte! And, Thanks For Writing Jane Eyre

When I revisited this post today, with a picture taken in the bleakest days of February when I reread Jane Eyre, I thought the photo a little dark. Yet, it is perfect for much of the novel. So many parts of it are almost hopeless, and yet we read on...
by Dolce Bellezza on Apr 21, 2016

How to Throw Jane Eyre a Birthday Party

While we at the Riot take some time off to rest and catch up on our reading, we’re re-running some of our favorite posts from the last several months. Enjoy our highlight reel, and we’ll be back with new stuff on Monday, … Continu...
by Book Riot on Jan 7, 2016

How to Throw Jane Eyre a Birthday Party

Full of gothic romance and proto-feminist social criticism, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre was first published on 16th October, 1847. And throwing our eponymous heroine a party to celebrate the 168th anniversary of her autobiography’s publication...
by Book Riot on Oct 16, 2015

Anatomy of a Scene: Jane Eyre’s Red Room

As a general rule I love adaptations, from the faithful to the experimental to the “it’s actually just the name you’re using, right?” I’m interested in the stories we choose to tell and retell across mediums, but I’m fascinated...
by Book Riot on Sep 15, 2015

Gifts for the Charlotte Brontë Fan in Your Life

You know what I like doing? Assembling lists of things. Also searching specific subjects on Etsy. So let’s see what the best Charlotte Brontë-related gifts and merch are out there. I’ll bet it’s some fun stuff. “I would alway...
by Book Riot on Sep 4, 2015

And I’d Do It Again: Books We Wish We Could Read Again for the First Time

Sometimes a reading a particular book can be so amazing, so life-changing, or so personal, that when other people read it, you feel envious that you can’t experience it for the first time all over again. They’re not always the best ̷...
by Book Riot on Aug 11, 2015

Be my (Victorian) Valentine?

Last February, I shared some inspiration for literary lines to use whatever your romantic situation on Valentine’s Day. And this year, I’m bringing you even more potential card-fillers (thank me later!). Can you name the novel for each line?The E...
by The Secret Victorianist on Feb 8, 2015

Review: Pollock's Toy Museum, London

To this crib I always took my doll; human beings must love something, and, in dearth of worthier objects of affection, I contrived to find a pleasure in loving and cherishing a faded, graven image, shabby as a miniature scarecrow. It puzzles me now t...
by The Secret Victorianist on Nov 10, 2014

#234 Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Today there was a book in the Goodwill bin at work and I couldn't help myself...I snatched it up.  Jane Eyre was one of my favorite books when I was a kid and when I saw the cover of this book, it was as if my hand had a will of its own.  It was a...
by Joy 365 on Nov 8, 2014

Art Review: Black Chronicles II (Autograph ABP), Rivington Place, London

When you study the past there are sometimes elisions – noticeable gaps which you know make your understanding incomplete. In Victorian literature I’ve talked about the lack of pregnancy bumps, despite the frequent babies. There’s the obsession...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 30, 2014

Five Thoughts on a First Ever Reading of Jane Eyre

A few years ago, I wrote a silly post about literary confessions — one of which was that I frequently confused Jane Eyre and Jane Austen. It was mostly a joke, but also when I told people that in real … Continued You just finished reading F...
by Book Riot on Sep 23, 2014

Review: The Black Robe, Wilkie Collins (1881)

Wilkie Collins’s 1881 The Black Robe tells the story of the misadventures of Lewis Romayne in a novel which deals with depression, madness, a fatal duel, marital breakdown, capture by South American ‘natives’, ill-motivated religious conversion...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jul 10, 2014

Teaching (Victorian) Literature; or the True and Lamentable Story of Literary Murder

Along with Shakespeare, the Victorian novel is perhaps the greatest victim of the British schooling system. For many, the only nineteenth-century novel they will ever read is a Bronte, Dickens or Hardy ‘ploughed’ through over months of tedious cl...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jan 7, 2014

Book Review: "The Flight of Gemma Hardy," by Margot Livesey

About this book: When her widower father drowns at sea, Gemma Hardy is taken from her native Iceland to Scotland to live with her kind uncle and his family. But the death of her doting guardian leaves Gemma under the care of her resentful aunt, and i...
by Susan Heim on Writing on Dec 28, 2013

Review: Behind a Mask, Louisa May Alcott (A.M. Barnard), 1866

Louisa May AlcottFor many, Louisa May Alcott’s name is entirely synonymous with her semi-autobiographical Little Women (1868) – a novel which can in some ways be seen to epitomise clean cut nineteenth-century morality. Yet the stories Alcott publ...
by The Secret Victorianist on Dec 26, 2013

Review: John Marchmont’s Legacy, Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1863)

Cartoon of Braddon as a circus girl, The Mask (1868) In case my previous blog posts haven’t quite given you the impression that I’m something of a Braddon-fanatic, this review of top sensation fiction specimen John Marchmont’s Legacy (1863) s...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 16, 2013

A Victorian Alphabet: C is for Caroline's Coriolanus

In a previous post, I looked at how emotional truths surpass the other benefits of classical learning for Charlotte Bronte heroines. But it’s not only in studying classicallanguages and literature that this preference for emotional education is exp...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 1, 2013

A Victorian Alphabet: C is for Caroline's Coriolanus

In a previous post, I looked at how emotional truths surpass the other benefits of classical learning for Charlotte Bronte heroines. But it’s not only in studying classicallanguages and literature that this preference for emotional education is exp...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 1, 2013


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