Blog Posts - Conservation



Influential conservation ecology papers of 2016

As I have done for the last three years (2015, 2014, 2013), here’s another retrospective list of the top 20 influential conservation papers of 2016 as assessed by experts in F1000 Prime. Scaling laws predict global microbial diversity — ...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 15, 2016

ConservationBytes.com Leaving the University of Adelaide

In reality, ConservationBytes.com isn’t going anywhere. But Corey Bradshaw is. You’ll still be able to read the regular posts on ConservationBytes.com without having to change a thing; I’ll just be writing them from a different offi...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 11, 2016

Genetic Management of Fragmented Animal and Plant Populations

That is the title of a new textbook that will be available mid-2017. After almost 6 years work, authors Dick Frankham, Jonathan Ballou, Katherine Ralls, Mark Eldridge, Michele Dudash, Charles Fenster, Bob Lacy & Paul Sunnucks have produced an...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 10, 2016

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XL

That’s ’40’, of course. Six more biodiversity cartoons, and the last for 2016. See full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here. — Filed under: cartoon, conservation, environmental policy, sc...
by Conservation Bytes on Dec 6, 2016

India has planted 50 million trees in just 24 hours

Foto:shoutscoop.comPolluted cities in India have become more green. Nearly 50 million trees have been planted, far surpassing the world record existet.The event took place in Uttar Pradesh Monday, one of the most populated cities in the north. More t...
by Potent Scientia Est on Sep 29, 2016

A Brent treasure: Roe Green Walled Garden Open Day Saturday September 10th

There will be an  Open Day at Roe Green Walled Garden in Kingsbury on Saturday September 10th from 10.30am until 4pm. This is another Brent resource, passionately supported by volunteers of the Barn Hill Conservation Group, that deserves to be b...
by wembleymatters on Sep 6, 2016

Inexorable rise of human population pressures in Africa

I’ve been a bit mad preparing for an upcoming conference, so I haven’t had a lot of time lately to blog about interesting developments in the conservation world. However, it struck me today that my preparations provide ideal material for...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 31, 2016

A healthcheck on England’s wildlife

Last week I wrote about how wildlife is in decline globally. One of the reasons for the grim statistics is development in previously untouched areas. As countries develop and populations expand, forests are cleared, swamps are drained, and habitats a...
by Make Wealth History on Aug 29, 2016

Damocles Sword: Challenging the Conservation Ethos

License to Kill It hardly seems true that badly ravaged and plundered ecosystems in India support abundance of wildlife, anymore.  Well according to the government this is true somewhere in some States. Hence the permission for legal cullin...
by Tiger Tours on Aug 25, 2016

Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXXVIII

Another six biodiversity cartoons for your midday chuckle & groan. There’s even one in there that takes the mickey out of some of my own research (see if you can figure out which one). See full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodive...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 25, 2016

We saved the Welsh Harp Environmental Centre - now help conserve its habitats this Sunday

The Welsh Harp Environmental Education Centre, loved by generations of Brent children, was saved from closure when Thames 21 took over its running.The extensive grounds need regular conservation to maximise habitat provision and volunteers are needed...
by wembleymatters on Aug 18, 2016

A world without wildlife?

Of all the things I’ve written about on the blog, this statistic stands out as one of the most stark: since 1970, the world’s wildlife populations have halved. That’s an extraordinary thought. The figure is from the WWF’s Livi...
by Make Wealth History on Aug 16, 2016

Rich and stable communities most vulnerable to change

I’ve just read an interesting new study that was sent to me by the lead author, Giovanni Strona. Published the other day in Nature Communications, Strona & Lafferty’s article entitled Environmental change makes robust ecological ne...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 16, 2016

Here's a tree-hugger's trail on Maui with a zillion birds and zero tourists

Maui has the fewest open trails among the Hawaiian Islands, so these hikes on the lower slopes of Haleakala are a find. You can choose several options in the Makawao Forest Reserve on the Kahakapao Loop trail, racking up about 6.5 miles and gaining a...
by Hawaii Photo Bank on Aug 15, 2016

Keeping India’s forests

I’ve just returned from a short trip to the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) in Bangalore, Karnataka, one of India’s elite biological research institutes. I was invited to give a series of seminars (you can see the titles he...
by Conservation Bytes on Aug 8, 2016

Tiger Conservation: It is a matter of space & protection

Although the tiger population has risen marginally in recent times, the animal is still in danger. Danger of extinction that is. The animal survives in National Parks and Tiger Reserves, these are protected areas. The survival can at best be describe...
by Tiger Tours on Aug 7, 2016

Journal ranks 2015

Back in February I wrote about our new bibliometric paper describing a new way to rank journals, which I still contend is a fairer representation of relative citation-based rankings. Given that the technique requires ISI, Google Scholar and Scopus d...
by Conservation Bytes on Jul 25, 2016

Join in Welsh Harp Conservation Day tomorrow

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by wembleymatters on Jul 22, 2016

More things stay the same, more we retrogress

Within six months of Abbott and the Coalition seizing power in the 2013 Australian election, decades—if not centuries—of environmental damage and retrograde policies unfolded. But this was no run-of-the-mill incompetence and neglect by government...
by Conservation Bytes on Jul 20, 2016

A Brilliant Substitute for Grass

TweetSo here's my invention..... See the photo of the drought stricken patch of grass? This grass is seen everywhere around suburbs in Ontario, Canada. Yes, we haven't had enough rain to support lush green grass, and secondly, the cost of watering yo...
by You Can Know Anything on Jul 19, 2016


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