Blog Posts - Elizabeth Gaskell



Wives and Daughters – Gaskell’s and Austen’s

Cynthia is like Zippy from British children’s cult TV show Rainbow – the naughty one is definitely the most lovable Wives and Daughters is more akin to being penned by the friend of Jane Austen than Charlotte Bronte. It is … Continu...
by Elspeth R on Apr 18, 2016

Be my (Victorian) Valentine?

Last February, I shared some inspiration for literary lines to use whatever your romantic situation on Valentine’s Day. And this year, I’m bringing you even more potential card-fillers (thank me later!). Can you name the novel for each line?The E...
by The Secret Victorianist on Feb 8, 2015

A Victorian Alphabet: W is for Witchcraft

With Halloween just around the corner, I thought I’d use ‘W’ in my Victorian Alphabet to look at a subject not often associated with the nineteenth-century – witchcraft.Those interested in witchcraft and the supernatural most often turn to Ea...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 29, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: V is for Vulnerable Victorian Virginity

Elizabeth Gaskell’s Ruth(1853) is one of the most famous nineteenth-century novels to deal with a ‘fallen woman’, who loses her virginity before marriage and bears an illegitimate child. And sympathetic as the novel is to Ruth, a dressmaker’s...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 17, 2014

Emigration Quiz: The Secret Victorianist heads to America

Exciting news! In the next few weeks the Secret Victorianist will be packing her bags and heading off to a new life in New York! Expect plenty of posts dealing with American nineteenth-century fiction and send any recommendations my way by tweeting @...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: I is for Infants, Industrialisation and Imagination

‘Is it possible, I wonder, that there was any analogy between the case of the Coketown population and the case of the little Gradgrinds?’Charles Dickens’s 1854 novel Hard Times certainly leads us to the conclusion that there is some point of co...
by The Secret Victorianist on Dec 15, 2013

Elizabeth Gaskell: Clopton House

Elizabeth Gaskell, by George Richmond"I wonder if you know Clopton Hall, about a mile from Stratford-on-Avon. Will you allow me to tell you of a very happy day I once spent there? I was at school in the neighbourhood, and one of my schoolfellows was...

Review: The Chronicles of Carlingford: The Rector and The Doctor's Family, Margaret Oliphant (1863)

Margaret Oliphant’s Chronicles of Carlingford (first published in Blackwood’s Magazine) deal with the lives of the inhabitants of a fictional English town – the domestic dramas of arrivals, departures, romances and deaths, played against a real...
by The Secret Victorianist on Nov 9, 2013

Elizabeth Gaskell: The Old Nurse's Story

You know, my dears, that your mother was an orphan, and an only child; and I dare say you have heard that your grand-father was a clergyman up in Westmoreland, where I come from. I was just a girl in the village school, when, one day, your grandmothe...

Nord et Sud – Elizabeth Gaskell

Nord et Sud d’Elizabeth Gaskell Broché : 685 pages Éditeur : Points (25 novembre 2010) Collection : Points Langue : Français Disponible sur liseuse : Oui Acheter sur Decitre ISBN-10 :2757820907 ISBN-13 : 978-2757820902 Prix éditeur : 8€9...
by Songe d'une nuit d'été on Oct 14, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Naomi

Over the past few weeks I've looked at a range of female characters who appear in fictional Victorian trials, considering novels and short stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Wilkie Collins. While I hope to come bac...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 7, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Naomi

Over the past few weeks I've looked at a range of female characters who appear in fictional Victorian trials, considering novels and short stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Wilkie Collins. While I hope to come bac...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 7, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mrs Beauly

A nineteenth-century divorce courtMoving on from the transparent innocence of Mary Barton and Esther Lyon, and the deceitful doubleness of Braddon’s two heroines, Wilkie Collins’s The Law and the Lady (1875) gives us yet another perspective on th...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mrs Beauly

A nineteenth-century divorce courtMoving on from the transparent innocence of Mary Barton and Esther Lyon, and the deceitful doubleness of Braddon’s two heroines, Wilkie Collins’s The Law and the Lady (1875) gives us yet another perspective on th...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Lady Audley and Phoebe

‘But Lady Audley doesn’t appear in court!’ I imagine quick-witted readers of M.E. Braddon’s 1862 novel Lady Audley’s Secret protesting. She doesn't. My consideration of female witnesses in fictional Victorian courts (introduced here) contin...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 28, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Lady Audley and Phoebe

‘But Lady Audley doesn’t appear in court!’ I imagine quick-witted readers of M.E. Braddon’s 1862 novel Lady Audley’s Secret protesting. She doesn't. My consideration of female witnesses in fictional Victorian courts (introduced here) contin...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 28, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Esther Lyon

A nineteenth-century divorce courtThe court, much like the theatre, is a place of revelation and display, and trials, inquests and other court hearings play a prominent role in Victorian fiction, providing great opportunities for dramatic action and...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 24, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Esther Lyon

A nineteenth-century divorce courtThe court, much like the theatre, is a place of revelation and display, and trials, inquests and other court hearings play a prominent role in Victorian fiction, providing great opportunities for dramatic action and...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 24, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mary Barton

A nineteenth-century divorce courtThe court, much like the theatre, is a place of revelation and display, and trials, inquests and other court hearings play a prominent role in Victorian fiction, providing great opportunities for dramatic action and...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 19, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mary Barton

A nineteenth-century divorce courtThe court, much like the theatre, is a place of revelation and display, and trials, inquests and other court hearings play a prominent role in Victorian fiction, providing great opportunities for dramatic action and...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 19, 2013


Trending Topics

Close