Blog Posts - Extinction



How to find fossils

Many palaeontologists and archaeologists might be a little put out by the mere suggestion that they can be told by ecologists how to do their job better. That is certainly not our intention. Like fossil-hunting scientists, ecologists regularly sear...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 29, 2016

How to find fossils

Many palaeontologists and archaeologists might be a little put out by the mere suggestion that they can be told by ecologists how to do their job better. That is certainly not our intention. Like fossil-hunting scientists, ecologists regularly sear...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 29, 2016

Sensitive numbers

You couldn’t really do ecology if you didn’t know how to construct even the most basic mathematical model — even a simple regression is a model (the non-random relationship of some variable to another). The good thing about even these s...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 22, 2016

Sensitive numbers

You couldn’t really do ecology if you didn’t know how to construct even the most basic mathematical model — even a simple regression is a model (the non-random relationship of some variable to another). The good thing about even these s...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 22, 2016

How likely is human extinction due to a natural pandemic?

A pandemic is the rapid spread of an infectious disease across a large region. Global pandemics will likely occur in the future, but their danger is very hard to estimate. So far, pandemics have received far more attention than other natural existent...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 21, 2016

How likely is human extinction due to a natural pandemic?

A pandemic is the rapid spread of an infectious disease across a large region. Global pandemics will likely occur in the future, but their danger is very hard to estimate. So far, pandemics have received far more attention than other natural existent...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 21, 2016

What will cause human extinction: natural disaster or human folly?

Existential risks can be divided into two groups: those that are caused by nature and those that are caused by humans (also known as anthropogenic risks). Natural risks come from the physical processes of the Earth, sun, and universe at large. These...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 7, 2016

What will cause human extinction: natural disaster or human folly?

Existential risks can be divided into two groups: those that are caused by nature and those that are caused by humans (also known as anthropogenic risks). Natural risks come from the physical processes of the Earth, sun, and universe at large. These...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 7, 2016

The difference between existential risks and global catastrophic risks

A global catastrophic risk is a possible future event that would cause severe harm to humans on a global scale. An existential risk is a global catastrophic risk that has a chance of rendering humanity extinct.
by Vision of Earth on Mar 6, 2016

The difference between existential risks and global catastrophic risks

A global catastrophic risk is a possible future event that would cause severe harm to humans on a global scale. An existential risk is a global catastrophic risk that has a chance of rendering humanity extinct.
by Vision of Earth on Mar 6, 2016

What is an existential risk?

An existential risk is a possible future event that could potentially cause the extinction of humans or the permanent destruction of our ability to thrive. Studying them is very challenging, but given what is at stake, existential risks need to be st...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 5, 2016

What is an existential risk?

An existential risk is a possible future event that could potentially cause the extinction of humans or the permanent destruction of our ability to thrive. Studying them is very challenging, but given what is at stake, existential risks need to be st...
by Vision of Earth on Mar 5, 2016

Environmental Arsehats

I’m starting a new series on ConservationBytes.com — one that exposes the worst environmental offenders on the planet. I’ve taken the idea from an independent media organisation based in Australia — Crikey — who has been running the...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 3, 2016

Environmental Arsehats

I’m starting a new series on ConservationBytes.com — one that exposes the worst environmental offenders on the planet. I’ve taken the idea from an independent media organisation based in Australia — Crikey — who has been running the...
by Conservation Bytes on Mar 3, 2016

Biowealth

While I’ve blogged about this before in general terms (here and here), I thought it wise to reproduce the (open-access) chapter of the same name published in late 2013 in the unfortunately rather obscure book The Curious Country produced by t...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 24, 2016

Biowealth

While I’ve blogged about this before in general terms (here and here), I thought it wise to reproduce the (open-access) chapter of the same name published in late 2013 in the unfortunately rather obscure book The Curious Country produced by t...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 24, 2016

Box Office Buz: DVD and Blu-ray releases for February 23, 2016

A bit of a slow down this week but still some cool stuff with killer catalog titles, the newest season of the one of the best shows on TV, and even some Oscar bait. These are your new releases for February 23, 2016. First up this week is the secon...
by Box Office Buz on Feb 23, 2016

Bad science

In addition to the surpassing coolness of reconstructing long-gone ecosystems, my new-found enthusiasm for palaeo-ecology has another advantage — most of the species under investigation are already extinct. That might not sound like an ‘adva...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 10, 2016

Bad science

In addition to the surpassing coolness of reconstructing long-gone ecosystems, my new-found enthusiasm for palaeo-ecology has another advantage — most of the species under investigation are already extinct. That might not sound like an ‘adva...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 10, 2016

It’s not always best to be the big fish

Loosely following the theme of last week’s post, it’s now fairly well established that humans tend to pick on the big species first. From fewer big trees, declines of big carnivores, elephant & rhino poaching, to fishing down the web...
by Conservation Bytes on Feb 3, 2016


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