Blog Posts - Origin Of Life



Alien Life Floating on Dwarf Stars - Science or Science Fiction?

Some brown dwarfs might not look very brown. Image courtesy of R. Hurt/NASA, public domain. Joel Kontinen Has the quest for alien life become an obsession for some astronomers? It seems so. They have even found worlds that might not exist. L...
by Joel Kontinen on Dec 3, 2016

Latest Space Signal Is a False Alarm, As Usual

Anyone there? The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Image courtesy of ESO/José Francisco Salgado (josefrancisco.org), Creative Commons (CC BY 4.0). Joel Kontinen The latest space signal is almost certainly a false alarm. No a...
by Joel Kontinen on Sep 4, 2016

Proxima b: Nearest Exoplanet Might Be Bombarded With Intense Solar Flares

An artist’s impression of Proxima b. Image courtesy of ESO/M. Kornmesser. Joel Kontinen Just over 4 light years away, Proxima b is the closest exoplanet we could get. What is more, astronomers think that it orbits its sun Proxima Centauri in...
by Joel Kontinen on Aug 25, 2016

Five-Eyed Aliens: Evolution and Imagination

Might space aliens look a bit like Opabinia regalis? Image courtesy of Nobu Tamura, Creative Commons (CC BY 3.0). Joel Kontinen A new article in The Conversation speculates on what aliens might look like. Matthew Willis, Professor of Evolutionar...
by Joel Kontinen on Aug 23, 2016

Darwinian Story: Thank Ancient Moss for the Oxygen You Breathe

Evolutionists tend to believe that these moss-covered rocks are hundreds of millions years old. Joel Kontinen Evolutionists have repeatedly claimed that oxygen made complex life possible. Usually, they mean the Cambrian Explosion, often called b...
by Joel Kontinen on Aug 17, 2016

How China is rewriting the book on human origins

The reconstructed skull of Peking Man, the fossil that launched discussions of human origins in China.Credit: DeAgostini/GettyOn the outskirts of Beijing, a small limestone mountain named Dragon Bone Hill rises above the surrounding sprawl. Along the...
by Geology on Jul 17, 2016

If life can make it here, it can make it anywhere

If the origin of life is common on other worlds, the universe should be a cosmic zoo full of complex multicellular organisms. This artist’s impression shows a sunset as seen from an exoplanet in another solar system – super-Earth Gliese 667 Cc,&...
by The Archaeology News Network on Jul 13, 2016

Losing genes and surviving: When 'less is more' in the evolution of life

The chordate O. dioica, despite losing lots of genes, maintains a typical body plan with organs and structures (heart, brain, thyroids, etc.) which can be considered to be homologues to the vertebrates.Credit: Image courtesy of Universidad de Barcelo...
by Geology on Jun 18, 2016

Complex life a billion years earlier than thought?

Researchers said Tuesday they had uncovered fossils showing that complex life on Earth began more than 1.5 billion years ago, nearly a billion years earlier than previously thought. Organic fragments extracted from the host rock of the Gaoyuzhuang m...
by The Archaeology News Network on May 19, 2016

Building-blocks of life

Biological evolution was preceded by a long phase of chemical evolution during which precursors of biopolymers accumulated. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemists have discovered an efficient mechanism for the prebiotic synthesis of...
by The Archaeology News Network on May 18, 2016

New Origin of Life Speculation Featuring Molecular Midwives

Molecular Midwives? Image courtesy of NASA/Jenny Mottar. Joel Kontinen When an article has a title like Molecular ‘Midwives’ Helped Give Birth to RNA we might perhaps not expect to read about empirical science, but then the origin of life b...
by Joel Kontinen on May 17, 2016

Earth’s Twin Is Still Missing, Despite Discovery of Over 1, 200 New Exoplanets

An artist’s impression of Kepler in action. Image courtesy of NASA. Joel Kontinen NASA has announced that its Kepler space observatory has found 1,284 new exoplanets, including roughly 550 Earth-sized ones. Of these, nine may orbit their star...
by Joel Kontinen on May 13, 2016

Wealth of unsuspected new microbes expands tree of life

This is a new and expanded view of the tree of life, with clusters of bacteria (left), uncultivable bacteria called 'candidate phyla radiation' (center, purple) and, at lower right, the Archaea and eukaryotes (green), including humans.Credit: Graphic...
by Geology on Apr 12, 2016

When life returned after a volcanic mass extinction

Representative ImageA worldwide mass extinction 201.5 million years ago wiped out 60 percent of sea life, including coral reefs and shelled marine animals. On land, the dead included many plants as well as giant reptiles that competed with the earlie...
by Geology on Apr 9, 2016

Supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

Artist's impression of supernova.Credit: Greg Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator LabAn international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered Earth with radioactive debris...
by Geology on Apr 7, 2016

SETI’s Logic: Searching for Life Where It Can’t Exist

SETI is searching for life on planets orbiting red dwarf stars. Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. Joel Kontinen The SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) project has used radio telescopes to scan the skies for signs of extraterrestria...
by Joel Kontinen on Apr 5, 2016

Sniffing for Life on Mars: ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter Goes to Search for Martian Life

An artist’s impression of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. Image courtesy of ATG medialab/ESA. Joel Kontinen The evolutionary worldview has life popping up in all places where it could potentially be possible. Next week, the European Space Agen...
by Joel Kontinen on Mar 10, 2016

Earth Is Extremely Unique, New Study Suggests

Earthrise suggests there’s no place like home. Image courtesy of NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University. Joel Kontinen 700 quintillion is a huge number: “a 7 followed by 20 zeros,” as Nathaniel Scharping puts it in Discover magazine. Tha...
by Joel Kontinen on Feb 25, 2016

Examining how terrestrial life's building blocks may have first formed

How did life begin? This is one of the most fundamental questions scientists puzzle over. To address it, they have to look not just back to the primordial Earth, but out into space. Now, scientists propose in the Journal of the American Chemical Soci...
by Geology on Feb 4, 2016

Modern microbial ecosystems provide window to early life on Earth

Elongate nested stromatolites, previously unknown in Hamelin Pool.Credit: Pamela Reid, Ph.D., UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric ScienceNew research from a University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led s...
by Geology on Feb 4, 2016


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