Blog Posts - Thomas Hardy



Thomas Hardy Quick Facts

Thomas HardyEnglish novelist and poet of the naturalist movement.ProfileFull Name: Thomas HardyAKA: Thomas Masterson HardyDate of Birth: June 2, 1840Place of Birth: Higher Bockhampton, Dorset, United KingdomZodiac Sign: GeminiDeath: January 11, 1928P...
by Tanvir's Blog on Apr 21, 2016

Alan Rickman’s Best Bookish Roles

On Thursday, January 14th, Alan Rickman passed away from cancer and leaves a horrible gaping hole in the entertainment world. As every Harry Potter fan (and casual observer) knows, Rickman was most well known for his role as Severus Snape, the vill...
by Book Riot on Jan 15, 2016

Reading Pathway: Ford Madox Ford

The symmetrically named Ford Madox Ford was actually born Ford Madox Hueffer on December 17, 1873. He changed his name in 1919, presumably because he thought it sounded too Germanic in the aftermath of World War I. Although Ford wrote … Continu...
by Book Riot on Nov 20, 2015

Movie Review: "Far from the Madding Crowd" ~ Now on Blu-ray, DVD and Digital!

Far from the Madding CrowdAbout the Movie:Carey Mulligan stars as a headstrong Victorian beauty in this sweeping romantic drama, based on the literary classic by Thomas Hardy. Mulligan plays Bathsheba Everdene, an independent woman who attracts three...
by Susan Heim on Parenting on Aug 15, 2015

How Reading Thomas Hardy Led Me to Romance Novels

We talk pretty regularly about romance here on Book Riot: debunking myths, sharing favourites, and poking gentle fun at how not to write about the genre. I wouldn’t consider myself “hard-core” or widely-read enough to be a romance fan so …...
by Book Riot on Jun 25, 2015

Oxford Haunts

When I travel, when I have time to plan, I like to visit the haunts of literary figures. It would be difficult to think of two more influential (or abbreviation-ridden) English writers than J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. … Continue reading →...

Books We Read Too Soon

Recently I read an essay on Tess of the D’Urbervilles that got me thinking. The author had failed at writing an essay on the book in high school, and, still totally ashamed of that fact, penned what I think is a brilliant think-piece on the b...
by Book Riot on Mar 20, 2015

Be my (Victorian) Valentine?

Last February, I shared some inspiration for literary lines to use whatever your romantic situation on Valentine’s Day. And this year, I’m bringing you even more potential card-fillers (thank me later!). Can you name the novel for each line?The E...
by The Secret Victorianist on Feb 8, 2015

Was Susan Hill Inspired by Thomas Hardy?

I wonder whether the Susan Hill poem being used in BBC Radio3's Carol competition was originally inspired as a riposte to the Thomas Hardy poem I quoted last year. ...
by James Powney's Blog on Dec 17, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: W is for Witchcraft

With Halloween just around the corner, I thought I’d use ‘W’ in my Victorian Alphabet to look at a subject not often associated with the nineteenth-century – witchcraft.Those interested in witchcraft and the supernatural most often turn to Ea...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 29, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: V is for Vulnerable Victorian Virginity

Elizabeth Gaskell’s Ruth(1853) is one of the most famous nineteenth-century novels to deal with a ‘fallen woman’, who loses her virginity before marriage and bears an illegitimate child. And sympathetic as the novel is to Ruth, a dressmaker’s...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 17, 2014

Emigration Quiz: The Secret Victorianist heads to America

Exciting news! In the next few weeks the Secret Victorianist will be packing her bags and heading off to a new life in New York! Expect plenty of posts dealing with American nineteenth-century fiction and send any recommendations my way by tweeting @...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2014

Far From the Madding Crowd ~ Thomas Hardy

Bathsheba Everdene is a strong spirited girl, and whilst she thinks she knows her own mind she has not a clue with regards to the workings of a man’s mind.Farmer Boldwood is a confirmed bachelor and even the beauty of Miss Everdene can’t turn his...
by Between The Lines on Aug 1, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: T is for Text, Time (and Trains)

A few days ago, I watched Richard Curtis’ About Time (2013) – a film which deals with time travel but through a romantic and domestic lens. The movie struck me in two ways – one, in its concentration on only one character who could travel throu...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jul 26, 2014

Oculto, como en un sueño o suspiro

Si Galileo hubiera dicho en verso que el mundo se movía, tal vez la Inquisición lo hubiera dejado en paz.Thomas Hardy...
by Avarana on Jun 6, 2014

Teaching (Victorian) Literature; or the True and Lamentable Story of Literary Murder

Along with Shakespeare, the Victorian novel is perhaps the greatest victim of the British schooling system. For many, the only nineteenth-century novel they will ever read is a Bronte, Dickens or Hardy ‘ploughed’ through over months of tedious cl...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jan 7, 2014

Thomas Hardy: The Superstitious Man's Story

'William, as you may know, was a curious, silent man; you could feel when he came near 'ee; and if he was in the house or anywhere behind your back without your seeing him, there seemed to be something clammy in the air, as if a cellar door was opene...

Thomas Hardy and the Oxen

I am not sure why, but I have always been moved by this poem by Thomas Hardy, which is at l;east topical this evening:Christmas Eve, and twelve of the clock."Now they are all on their knees,"An elder said as we sat in a flockBy the embers in hearthsi...
by James Powney's Blog on Dec 24, 2013

A Victorian Alphabet: H is for Hardy's Hair Extensions

Hair extensions may be more frequently associated with The Only Way is Essex than Far From the Madding Crowd, but rendering complex and voluminous nineteenth-century hairstyles couldn’t always rely on women’s natural hair – and often didn’t.
by The Secret Victorianist on Nov 30, 2013

A Victorianist's Guide to Oxford

‘Towery city and branchy between towers’ – the opening line of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s poem ‘Duns Scotus’s Oxford’ has always summed up for me the appearance of England’s first university city on a sunny morning. One of Oxford’s gre...
by The Secret Victorianist on Nov 12, 2013


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