Blog Posts - Wilkie Collins



Our 5 Favorite Literary Villains

Who are your favorite literary baddies?
by Book Riot on Jun 1, 2016

Review: Poor Miss Finch, Wilkie Collins (1871-2)

Illustration from Poor Miss FinchWriting in the 1880s, John Ruskin was dismissive about the merits of Collins’s Poor Miss Finch, summarising its plot as evidence of its ridiculousness: ‘the heroine is blind, the hero epileptic, and the obnoxious...
by The Secret Victorianist on Dec 7, 2014

Review: The Black Robe, Wilkie Collins (1881)

Wilkie Collins’s 1881 The Black Robe tells the story of the misadventures of Lewis Romayne in a novel which deals with depression, madness, a fatal duel, marital breakdown, capture by South American ‘natives’, ill-motivated religious conversion...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jul 10, 2014

Hope quote

While there`s life, there`s hope.  Heart and Science by Wilkie Collins   Filed under: Wilkie Collins...
by BookQuotesHub on Jul 10, 2014

Quote about fools

Nature`s protecting care of fools supplies them with an instinct which distrusts ability. Heart and Science by Wilkie Collins   Filed under: Wilkie Collins...
by BookQuotesHub on Jul 10, 2014

Humility quote

The first and last step in the education of the judgment is – Humility.  Heart and Science by Wilkie Collins Filed under: Wilkie Collins...
by BookQuotesHub on Jul 8, 2014

A Victorian Alphabet: Q is for Quiz!

'Q' means quiz time in my Victorian Alphabet series. What type of nineteenth-century novel should YOU be a heroine in?
by The Secret Victorianist on May 10, 2014

A Diving Bell For History

Back in 2012 – a time that seems, alarmingly, too recent and too long ago, both at the same time – one of my earliest articles for BookRiot was about my peculiar obsession with Charles Dickens. The peculiarity of my … Continued You just f...
by Book Riot on Mar 27, 2014

Teaching (Victorian) Literature; or the True and Lamentable Story of Literary Murder

Along with Shakespeare, the Victorian novel is perhaps the greatest victim of the British schooling system. For many, the only nineteenth-century novel they will ever read is a Bronte, Dickens or Hardy ‘ploughed’ through over months of tedious cl...
by The Secret Victorianist on Jan 7, 2014

Review: Behind a Mask, Louisa May Alcott (A.M. Barnard), 1866

Louisa May AlcottFor many, Louisa May Alcott’s name is entirely synonymous with her semi-autobiographical Little Women (1868) – a novel which can in some ways be seen to epitomise clean cut nineteenth-century morality. Yet the stories Alcott publ...
by The Secret Victorianist on Dec 26, 2013

Mary Elizabeth Braddon - feminist? The Secret Victorianist blogs for FWSA

Illustration for Joshua Haggard's Daughter (1876)I check out the feminist credentials of the sensational Mary Elizabeth Braddon over on the Feminist & Women's Studies Association blog!
by The Secret Victorianist on Nov 15, 2013

Wilkie Collins: Blow up with the brig, a sailor's story

I HAVE got an alarming confession to make. I am haunted by a Ghost.If you were to guess for a hundred years, you would never guess what my ghost is. I shall make you laugh to begin with--and afterward I shall make your flesh creep. My Ghost is the gh...

Wilkie Collins: The Dead Hand

When this present nineteenth century was younger by a good many years than it is now, a certain friend of mine, named Arthur Holliday, happened to arrive in the town of Doncaster exactly in the middle of the race-week, or, in other words, in the midd...

Film Review: The Invisible Woman (2013)

Felicity Jones as Nelly in The Invisible Woman Claire Tomalin’s 1990 The Invisible Woman is the biography which was never meant to exist – of Nelly (Ellen) Ternan, actress and secret mistress of writer and famously paternal figure Charles Dick...
by The Secret Victorianist on Oct 23, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Naomi

Over the past few weeks I've looked at a range of female characters who appear in fictional Victorian trials, considering novels and short stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Wilkie Collins. While I hope to come bac...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 7, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Naomi

Over the past few weeks I've looked at a range of female characters who appear in fictional Victorian trials, considering novels and short stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Wilkie Collins. While I hope to come bac...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 7, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mrs Beauly

A nineteenth-century divorce courtMoving on from the transparent innocence of Mary Barton and Esther Lyon, and the deceitful doubleness of Braddon’s two heroines, Wilkie Collins’s The Law and the Lady (1875) gives us yet another perspective on th...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2013

Women in the Witness Box: Mrs Beauly

A nineteenth-century divorce courtMoving on from the transparent innocence of Mary Barton and Esther Lyon, and the deceitful doubleness of Braddon’s two heroines, Wilkie Collins’s The Law and the Lady (1875) gives us yet another perspective on th...
by The Secret Victorianist on Sep 2, 2013

A Dickensian Master Class in First Person Narration

Christmas edition of All Year Round (1863)I recently read Charles Dickens’s Mrs Lirriper’s Lodgings (1863) for the first time. Initially published in a Christmas edition of Dickens’s publication – All Year Round – this first person story, n...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 12, 2013

A Dickensian Master Class in First Person Narration

Christmas edition of All Year Round (1863)I recently read Charles Dickens’s Mrs Lirriper’s Lodgings (1863) for the first time. Initially published in a Christmas edition of Dickens’s publication – All Year Round – this first person story, n...
by The Secret Victorianist on Aug 12, 2013


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